Mar 30, 2020  
2018-2019 Catalog 
    
2018-2019 Catalog [ARCHIVED CATALOG]

Liberal Arts and Sciences


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Departments

English

Chairperson Melissa Flanagan, P-146-A, 352-395-5026
Administrative Assistant Hilary Zetrouer, P-146, 352-395-5372

Fine Arts

Chairperson Alora Haynes, E-128, 352-395-5296
Administrative Assistant Missy Hamlow, E-127, 352-395-5310

High School Dual Enrollment

Director Jen Homard, R-008, 352-395-5493
Office Manager Brenda Evans, R-006, 352-395-5483

Honors Program

Coordinator Bobby Hom, B-212, 352-395-4141

Humanities and Foreign Languages

Chairperson Bill Stephenson, P-154, 352-395-4418
Administrative Assistant Zona Gale, P-152, 352-395-5075

Mathematics

Chairperson Kathleen Arnold P-267, 352-395-5588
Administrative Assistant Noah Hundley, P-267, 352-395-5297

Natural Sciences

Chairperson Vertigo Moody, X-201, 352-395-5842
Administrative Assistant Oralia Gamino, X-201, 352-395-5349

Social and Behavioral Sciences

Chairperson David Tegeder, P-155, 352-395-5083
Administrative Assistant Mikayla Klein, P-148, 352-395-5300

Mission

The Division of Liberal Arts and Sciences provides the curricula whereby Santa Fe College students satisfy general education requirements and obtain the prerequisite courses required for transfer to upper-division university programs. This division furthers the college’s mission by providing a strong liberal arts education leading to the Associate in Arts degree; preparing students with diverse backgrounds and goals for careers, further academic study and lifelong learning; creating intellectual independence by teaching creative thinking, critical reasoning and problem-solving skills; building an awareness of self, diverse opinions and cultures, and one’s responsibility within the global community; promoting the attainment of a balanced core of knowledge drawn from various discipline areas; and providing a personalized, supportive learning environment that challenges students to achieve high levels of academic performance.

Associate in Arts (AA) Degree

The college offers the Associate in Arts degree to students wishing to transfer to a baccalaureate program within the Florida College or Florida State University systems upon completing an Associate’s degree.

In keeping with the Florida statewide articulation agreement, each institution granting the Associate in Arts degree sets its own general education requirements and stipulates the additional elective hours required for the degree. By law, the articulation agreement provides that every Associate in Arts graduate of a Florida college be granted admission to the upper division of a state university, except to a limited access or teacher certification program or a major program requiring an audition. Students earning the Associate in Arts degree and transferring to one of Florida’s public universities will not be required by the university to take additional general education courses.

Although the Associate in Arts degree does not require the choice of a major or area of concentration, students are advised early in their academic careers to be aware of the upper-division requirements in specific fields of study. As a result, they may be able to choose courses within the required general education core that meet the prerequisites for their chosen field of study. In addition, the Associate in Arts degree requires 24 hours of electives, which should be carefully chosen to meet the future needs of each student upon transfer to the upper division. Although the college will make every attempt to advise students concerning upper-division requirements for the various majors, students are urged to become familiar with the requirements of the upper-division institutions to which they plan to transfer. Students must select a program major by the time they complete 24 college credit hours. With the help of their advisors, students should choose electives that will be most advantageous in the pursuit of their intended bachelor’s degrees. Each upper-division program in a Florida public state institution annually publishes counseling manuals for every major offered at that institution.

Because of the complicated prerequisites and other requirements associated with fine arts programs, students pursuing an AA degree in a fine arts area should consult with the discipline coordinators of their program for proper academic advisement: Dance, Tari Kendall, 395-5916; Music/Vocal, Lynn Sandefur, 381-3639; Music/Instrumental, Sheila Forrester, 381-3862, ext. 6317; Theatre, Terry Klenk, 395-5092; Technical Theatre, Owen Reynolds, 395-5985; Visual Arts, Matthew Newell, 395-5810.

Requirements for the Associate in Arts Degree

  • Complete the basic 36-hour requirement of the general education program.
  • Complete at least 60 semester hours of credit in a prescribed course of study with a minimum 2.0 grade point average.
  • Demonstrate competency in a foreign language.
  • Select courses from those with an assigned ID code of P (Parallel). Courses designated O (Occupational) are not guaranteed for acceptance by upper-division institutions and cannot be used as elective credit in the AA degree.
  • Meet Rule 6A-10.30 (Gordon Rule). Courses marked with an asterisk (*) will meet a portion of this rule.
  • Pay all fees and discharge all other financial obligations to the college.

General Education

The purpose of general education at Santa Fe College is to foster a disciplined curiosity that leads to empowerment of the student as an intentional learner and to lay the foundation for lifelong learning. By exploring many aspects of the traditional arts and sciences, students will learn about the human imagination and the products of cultural history and expression, the interrelationships within and among social and global communities, models that help to understand the patterns and behaviors of the natural world and social structures, and the values essential to local or global civic engagement. Specifically, students will encounter these ideas through courses in the sciences, mathematics, communications, the social sciences, the arts and humanities.

While exploring these disciplines, students will also develop the college-level skills in communication, critical thinking, information literacy, scientific and quantitative reasoning, and global responsibility necessary for lifelong learning. In this way, the College seeks not only to instill knowledge, but also to integrate skills and knowledge within the context of cultural and professional competencies.

By design, this practical liberal education is highly concentrated within the core of required arts and sciences courses. However, the knowledge and skills from these courses are reinforced in many areas of the curriculum, including elective courses, vocational courses and a variety of capstone learning experiences that interrelate principle and application.

General Education Learning Outcomes

Communication

Demonstrate effective reading, writing, speaking, listening and nonverbal communication skills (Communication A).

Attributes associated with attaining this outcome include the ability to:

  • Recognize an author’s main idea and organizational strategies, understand the impact of an author’s word choice, style, expository strategy on a written text;
  • Present information in college-level, multi-paragraph essays that follow the rules and conventions of Standard Written English;
  • Articulate (orally) ideas and concepts;
  • Listen to and/or receive information without bias and verify through critiques, feedback forms and reaction papers.

For nonverbal communication disciplines (Humanities A):

  • Deliver subject matter and content through the use of voice and body language;
  • Present information and evidence in an accurate, appropriate and integrated manner;
  • Articulate (orally) ideas and concepts;
  • Listen to and/or receive information without bias and verify through critiques, feedback forms, reaction papers, etc.;
  • Write using correct grammar, organize subject matter and develop ideas coherently.
Critical Thinking

Demonstrate the skills necessary for analysis, synthesis, evaluation, decision-making, critical and creative thinking, and the creative process (Humanities B and Social Sciences A).

Attributes associated with attaining this outcome include the ability to:

  • Analyze and synthesize data, information and substantive content relevant to an issue or problem;
  • Evaluate data, information and substantive content (e.g., drawing conclusions, solutions or making decisions).
Scientific Reasoning

Understand scientific concepts, analyze and interpret various types of data and demonstrate scientific reasoning (Natural Sciences A and B).

Attributes associated with attaining this outcome include the ability to:

  • Use deductive and inductive inferences;
  • Control variables;
  • Use of the scientific method (gather, analyze, and synthesize data relevant to a problem);
  • Apply a model to a new situation;
  • Interpret, based on fundamental theories;
  • Interpret data in both tabular and graphical form;
  • Apply of specialized knowledge to a different or larger context.
Quantitative Reasoning

Understand and apply mathematical concepts and reasoning and analyze and interpret various types of data.

Attributes associated with attaining this outcome include the ability to:

  • Analyze/interpret quantitative data verbally, graphically, symbolically and numerically.
  • Communicate quantitative data verbally, graphically, symbolically and numerically.
  • Use mathematical concepts in problem-solving through integration of new material and modeling.
Global-Socio-Cultural Responsibility

Demonstrate an understanding of diversity/pluralism in the world community and an awareness of civic and social participation and ethical and informed decision making (Humanities C and Social Sciences B).

Attributes associated with attaining this outcome include the ability to:

  • Analyze data, information and substantive content relevant to diversity and pluralism in the world;
  • Synthesize data, information and substantive content relevant to diversity and pluralism in the world;
  • Use data, information and substantive content related to diversity and pluralism in order to draw conclusions, propose solutions and make decisions.

General Education “Communications”

Description and Rationale

The Communications category of general education is designed to help students master the forms and conventions of the academic essay, and fluency in standard written English. Courses are designed to strengthen reading skills while teaching clear and effective written communication: the ability to organize and develop ideas effectively. Specifically, courses focus on essay organization, paragraph development, and basic writing strategies-including performing these tasks under time constraints.

Method

Content is concentrated on developing communication skills. Students will learn effective reading, writing, speaking and listening skills through the discussion of reading assignments, multiple essay assessments, and peer review and collaborative exercises.

Criteria for courses

The exchange of ideas between students and a regular interchange between instructor and student are crucial to the learning outcomes for this category; students will fail to meet minimal course requirements if they do not attend regularly. With that in mind, the English department requires that students attend at least 85% of the class meetings to receive credit for courses in the communications category. Because this course substantially depends on communication skills– interactive class activities, in-class writing assignments, peer-response exercises, and a strict schedule of writing assignments that must be turned in on time–attendance is mandatory. Courses under this category must be writing intensive. To meet the writing intensive requirement, 70% of the final grade earned must come from formal written assignments. Because a major component of a writing intensive course is to provide feedback early and often, courses must include multiple written assignments.

Learning Outcomes

Through various written assignments, students will be assessed for communication skills; successful communication involves expressing oneself within the conventions of a medium and working in many genres and styles. It can involve working in many different disciplines and technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images. Communication abilities develop through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

General Education Humanities “Core Humanities” and “Fine Arts”

Description and Rationale

The Core Humanities Fine Arts category of General Education is designed to introduce students to both conventional academic as well as kinesthetic explorations of the Fine Arts. As such, courses in this category must have a strong emphasis on concepts key to each of the fine arts, including philosophical, aesthetic and methodological concepts of each individual form. Traditionally, the Fine Arts have included the study of visual arts, music, theatre and dance through the kinesthetic practice of their various forms along with the academic study of their respective cultural, historical, critical and theoretical contexts. Historically, public speaking is included in the Core Humanities Fine Arts General Education category, because of its emphasis on both rhetorical practice and academic critical analysis.

Method

The Core Humanities Fine Arts category is concerned with the study and practice of its various disciplines, both by practical applications of theory in the studio as well as through student engagement within the traditional classroom setting. The study of recognized and experimental methods, historically established and contemporary viewpoints, represent ongoing explorations of the field in an ever changing global world. Methods value lecture and demonstration, but also performance and improvisation, linear and non-linear thinking, the embracing of new technologies and an appreciation of evolving human relationships expressed by the form.

Criteria for Courses

Courses eligible for inclusion in this category must include substantial and broad coverage of defined theory and study of accepted and experimental methods and concepts most prevalent in the fine arts or in the study and practice of oral communications.

Both the Fine Arts and Humanities and Foreign Languages department requires participation and attendance. Courses oriented toward specialized topics may comprise valuable fine arts electives but should not be included in this category of core courses.

Learning Outcomes

Through various assignments, students will be assessed for communication skills; successful communication involves expressing oneself within the conventions of a medium and working in many genres and styles. It can involve working in many different disciplines and technologies, and mixing texts, data, and images. Communication abilities develop through iterative experiences across the curriculum.

General Education “Mathematics”

Description and Rationale

Courses in the Mathematics category of general education are designed to provide the educational climate and activities needed to help build basic mathematical literacy in every student and to foster intellectual independence. In an increasingly complex world, mathematical thinking, understanding, and skill are more important than ever. Many concepts will be introduced using real world data from various areas, and other concepts will be reinforced by applying them to problems in the areas of science, engineering, business, economics, and medicine, amongst others.

Method

Intellectual independence and mathematical literacy are supported by emphasizing creative thinking, critical reasoning, and problem-solving skills while developing an understanding of both skills and concepts. In so doing, we are charged with creating a supportive learning environment while challenging students with high expectations of achievement.

Criteria for Courses

Courses eligible for inclusion in this category must support the following goals of the Math Department:

  • Engage students in sound mathematical thinking and reasoning. This should include students finding patterns, generalizing, and asking/answering relevant questions.
  • Provide a setting that prepares students to read and learn mathematics on their own.
  • Explore multiple representations of topics including graphical, symbolic, numerical, oral, and written. Encourage students to make connections among the various representations to gain a richer, more flexible understanding of each concept.
  • Analyze the structure of real-world problems and plan solution strategies. Solve the problems using appropriate tools.
  • Develop a mathematical vocabulary by expressing mathematical ideas orally and in writing.
  • Enhance and reinforce the students understanding of concepts through the use of technology when appropriate.

Learning Outcomes

As a result of successfully completing a general education mathematics course, students should be able to demonstrate the following:

  • Analyze and interpret quantitative data verbally, graphically, symbolically and numerically.
  • Communicate quantitative data verbally, graphically, symbolically and numerically.
  • Appropriately integrate technology into mathematical processes.
  • Use mathematical concepts in problem-solving through integration of new material and modeling.

General Education “Natural Science”

Description and Rationale

Courses in the Natural Science category of general education are designed to provide the educational climate and activities needed to help build basic science literacy in every student and to foster intellectual independence.

Method

Intellectual independence is supported by emphasizing creative thinking, critical reasoning, and problem-solving skills while basic science literacy is gained through the facts and skills associated with training in the sciences. In so doing, we are charged with creating a personalized, supportive learning environment while challenging students to reach high standards of achievement.

Criteria for Courses

Courses eligible for inclusion in this category should be broad introductory courses that include a focus on the process of performing scientific investigations and the verification and authentication of published results. Courses narrowly focused on one aspect of the subject matter and should not be included in this general education category.

Learning Outcomes

Students should gain the ability to demonstrate the following (with the level of proficiency variable with the level of the course).

  • The ability to engage in a scientific reasoning process (induction, deduction, hypothesis testing, etc.)
  • The proper use of key science concepts associated with the course
  • The application of science concepts presented/discussed in this course to human experience in everyday life
  • The proper use of mathematical tools
  • The ability to communicate their knowledge in both oral and written form appropriate to the discipline

General Education “Social Sciences”

Description and Rationale

The Core General Education Social Sciences category is designed to introduce students to the study of the larger historical and political world, the interaction of people and cultures, and the diversity of human experience. Thus the category is inherently multidisciplinary, encompassing a wide range of perspectives and methodologies that explore the behavior of individuals and societies, past and present. Traditionally, the social sciences include such disciplines as anthropology, economics, geography, psychology, sociology, political science, and history.

Method Core

Social Sciences courses call upon students to analyze and synthesize information in an effort to instill knowledge within a discipline’s subject area. Such courses expose students to the research, concepts, and theoretical perspectives that can greatly increase their ability to understand and explain various aspects of human society. Ideally, the Core Social Sciences give students a substantial start in building a conceptual basis from which to interpret themselves and overall human behavior in an increasingly diverse, global society.

Criteria for Courses

Courses eligible for inclusion in this category must provide broad and substantial coverage of a traditional social science discipline. As a fundamental element of General Education, they should be introductory courses that survey the major issues, themes, and theoretical frameworks of a subject area. Courses that narrowly focus on a single aspect of a subject area, much like an upper-level course designed for college majors, should not be included in this general education category.

Learning Outcomes

Through a variety of assignments, Core Social Sciences courses will assess the “Critical Thinking” General Education Learning Outcome. According to the American Association of Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) VALUE rubric, “critical thinking is a habit of mind characterized by the comprehensive exploration of issues, ideas, artifacts, and events before accepting or formulating an opinion or conclusion.”
 

CIVICS LITERACY REQUIREMENT:

Starting in the 2018-19 academic year, the State of Florida requires all first-time-in college students pursuing an associate of arts or baccalaureate degree to demonstrate competency in civic literacy (see section 1007.25(4), Florida Statute) through one of the following options prior to graduation:

1) Successfully passing either AMH 2020 (US History Survey Since 1877) or POS 2041 (American National Government)

2) Achieving the standard score on one of the following assessments:

            Assessment                                                                 Standard Score

            AP Government and Politics: United States                  3

            AP United States History                                               4

            CLEP American Government                                       50

Foreign Language Competency

Beginning with students entering in the Fall 2014 semester, all students must demonstrate competency in a foreign language as a requirement for the Associate in Arts degree. This requirement may be met in one of the following ways: completing two sequential credits of secondary (high school) instruction in one foreign language; completing a post-secondary foreign language course at the elementary 2 level (the second course in a foreign language sequence); or achieving an appropriate score on the CLEP, AP, or other standard examination, which may earn up to eight credits from the College. A student who demonstrates proficiency in a native language other than English is exempt from this requirement, though the College may specify conditions or requirements for the documentation of such competency in less commonly taught languages.

Currently, Santa Fe College offers classes in American Sign Language, French, Mandarin Chinese, and Spanish and may offer other languages as well. Through an agreement between Santa Fe College and the University of Florida, SF students may also be able to register for foreign languages not offered at Santa Fe on a space available basis. For more information about languages offered at UF, please contact the Department of Humanities and Foreign Languages, Building P, room 152, or call 352-395-5075.

Gordon Rule Writing Courses

The purpose of the Writing-Intensive requirement at Santa Fe College is to assist students refine their college-level writing skills. College-level writing exhibits critical and analytical skills in discussing a topic; presents paragraphs that are focused, developed, organized, coherent, and unified; expresses ideas in complete, clear, well-structured sentences; and enhances ideas through discipline-appropriate diction, conventions, and rhetorical strategies.

A Writing-Intensive Course has as major instructional, learning and assessment objectives, a substantial discipline-based writing component. This requires multiple opportunities for students to (1) demonstrate disciplined-based writing competency (2) receive appropriate feedback and (3) to incorporate that feedback into assignments within the same course and semester.1 Note that any work submitted too late in the semester for the instructor comments to be available to the students cannot be used to meet the writing-intensive requirement. While no specific word-count is required writing must be a central component of the course.

Individual LAS Departments will be responsible for identifying appropriate types of “disciplined-based writing” assignments and providing any additional guidelines for writing intensive courses in the discipline. However, some assignments are unlikely to be suitable for these purposes. For example, teamwork or writing done by a group or team and class notes are unlikely to satisfy the requirement.

In a Writing-Intensive Course, writing assignments must count at least a significant part of the final course grade. The majority of writing assignments are assessed by faculty towards refining college level writing skills. Instructors must evaluate written work on its content and content development (i.e., effectiveness, organization, clarity, and coherence of the writing). General comments about syntax, mechanics, and usage of standard written English should also be provided, including if necessary, reference to the Writing Lab or other relevant available resources. Instructors must provide feedback to the student on the written work submitted. Rubrics are available for faculty use in providing feedback.

In order to receive credit for a writing intensive course, students must satisfactorily complete the writing portion of a Writing-Intensive Course, and receive an overall grade of C or higher. If a student does not receive a C AND satisfactorily complete the writing portion of the course, a course grade of D or below will be assigned. A grade of D or D+ will allow the course to count as an elective, but neither Writing Intensive nor General Education credit will be given.

Research and Analysis

Research is a systematic process of identifying a topic and of exploring issues / objects / works through the collection and analysis of evidence that result in informed conclusions/ judgments. Analysis is the process of organizing and synthesizing evidence to reveal insightful patterns, differences, or similarities related to a focused topic. (AAC&U Inquiry and Analysis Value Rubric)

Students in a Research and Analysis Course will develop a substantial discipline-based research project. Individual LAS Departments will be responsible for identifying appropriate types of “substantial disciplined-based research projects.” Research & Analysis courses will be writing intensive as described by the current definition of “writing intensive”

As the General Education Learning Outcome for Research and Analysis Courses is Information Literacy, instructors must assess the student’s “ability to know when there is a need for information, to be able to identify, locate, evaluate, and effectively and responsibly use and share that information for the problem at hand.” (AAC&U Information Literacy Value Rubric).


1 Note that the specification that the student be able to incorporate feedback into multiple assignments requires that the professor offer at least three writing assignments. Otherwise the student would not have more than one opportunity to incorporate instructor feedback. I do not know what the best number of assignments might be, I suspect that if there is a “best number of assignments,” it would vary between disciplines. Also, it is not clear to me that a word-count (no matter how high) would generate more assignments than the current wording.

Programs

    Associate in Arts

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